Valencia For 91 Days

For 91 Days, we explored sunny Valencia, home of paella and the third-largest city in Spain. We already knew Valencia well… in fact it’s our adopted home, and the place we return to whenever we’re taking a break from traveling. Whether you’re planning your own journey to Valencia, or are just interested in seeing why we chose to make it our permanent base, our articles and photographs should help you out. Start at the beginning of our adventures, visit our comprehensive index to find something specific, or choose one of the articles selected at random, below:

There’s not a city in the world Jürgen and I know quite so well as Valencia. We lived here for years before starting our travel project, and should there ever come a day we’re ready to settle down, it’s to Valencia that we’ll return. We figured our favorite city on Earth deserved the full attention of our blog, so we spent 91 days seeing the sights as though we were newcomers.

With a history reaching back to 1263, Corpus Christi is perhaps Valencia’s oldest festival, and remains one of its most popular. Occurring 60 days after Easter, the festival is held in honor of the Eucharist, but really it just provides another excuse for Valencians to get out on the street and have a good time.

Nowhere is the ancient history of Valencia more palpable than at L’Almoina: a former archaeological site which has been converted into a museum. Found next to the cathedral, L’Almoina takes visitors on a walk underneath the ground, and back through time.

If you’re looking at the Turia Riverbed using a satellite program such as Google Earth, you might be surprised by the presence of a giant tied onto the ground with ropes. And zoom in closer… what are those little specks climbing all over him? Lilliputians?



In December 2016, the Fallas Festival of Valencia was included in UNESCO’s list of intangible cultural heritage. To celebrate, we’ve created a bunch of GIFs which you’re free to use (if you do, please link back to this article). You can also find them on the GIF-search from both Facebook and Twitter GIF; just search for “Mascleta” and “Fallas Valencia”.

Having seen the castle and most of the other principal sights on our first day in Xàtiva, we awoke early on our second day for an excellent 14-kilometer hike. We’d be following PRV-78, a circular path that leads along the Albaida River, past an ancient aqueduct and caves, and through groves of orange trees, before heading back into town.

If the low-lying fields which surround Valencia are known for rice and horchata-producing chufas, then the mountainous areas farther inland are known for wine, particularly the endemic Valencian variety called Bobal. We made a trip to the province’s most important wine-producing region, Utiel-Requena, to visit the popular Hoya de Cadenas vineyards.